Tsvangirai apologises for saying the truth on Zanu PF Judges

Harare,-Morgan Tsvangirai, Zimbabwe’s Prime Minister, has succumbed to threats of arrest and has withdrawn his comments against the Supreme Court ruling which nullified the election of Lovemore Moyo as Speaker of Parliament.

Moyo is the MDC-T national chairperson and a confidante to Tsvangirai.

On Tuesday Tsvangirai said he and his party believed in the independence of the Judiciary and that executive interference in the work of the Judiciary should not be allowed.

“My recent comments on the Judiciary were clearly an immediate reaction against a judgement that affected the morale of my party,” Tsvangirai said.

“Those comments should not be taken out of context. They are not in any was a departure from my strong belief in judicial independence nor were they meant to undermine anyone.”

Recently Tsvangirai denounced the Supereme Court saying “as a party we will not accept the decision of some Zanu (PF) politicians masquerading as judges. Zanu (PF) is trying to use the courts to subvert what it lost in an election.”

But on Tuesday Tsvangirai said the MDC-T as a party; they remained committed to judicial independence.

“We have never sought to undermine anyone in the Judiciary and we will continue to place our matters before the courts,” he said. “That is why, as recently as last Saturday, our lawyers were before Justice Chiweshe, arguing for the lifting of the ban on our peace rally.”

He said the MDC-T was a genuinely democratic party which believes in Constitutionalism and the rule of law.

“At the core of the rule of law is the belief that disputes must be settled after due process and that there can be no resort to self-redress and self execution. That is why for many years, the MDC has persistently and consistently sought redress in the courts of Zimbabwe,” he said.

“We have filed endless applications with different results with the various courts in Zimbabwe. The reason why we did this was our strong belief in the Judiciary and we still believe that disputes can be resolved in the courts of this country.”