Mugabe confirms the death of Gaddafi's son

TRPOLI, Libya – One of the sons of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has reportedly died from injuries in a hospital in the capital Tripoli, according to information from opposition websites and Arab media.

Speculation is swirling worldwide that one of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi’s sons, Khamis (27), died in hospital on Monday following a weekend attack on a residence in Tripoli.

On Monday, President Robert Mugabe condemned the coalition strikes on the Libyan leader saying African leaders now regret supporting the intervention in Libya.

He said it was like committing treason against “ourselves”.

President Mugabe one of the Libyan President’s closest allies said the Western powers now want to kill Gaddafi himself after killing his son; literally confirming the death of Khamis. 

But the reports were being denied by the Libyan government and other media organisations.

Although there was no independent verification of the reported death, an Arabic newspaper, Arabian Business News, said Gaddafi’s son had died.

Khamis, Gaddafi’s sixth son, was reportedly injured on Saturday when a Libyan Air Force pilot purposefully crashed his jet into the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli where Gaddafi and some of his relatives are staying.

Khamis was reported to have died of burn wounds sustained during the attack. He was the commander of the Khamis Brigade, a Special Forces brigade which is fiercely loyal to his father.

The reported death comes as the coalition forces face accusations of wanting to kill the beleaguered Libyan leader.

Gaddafi’s son is a graduate from the military academy in Tripoli. He also trained in Russia’s Frunze Military Academy.

Khamis Gaddafi was reportedly injured on Saturday by a Libyan air force pilot who purposefully crashed his jet into the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli where Gaddafi and some of his relatives were staying, The Times reported on Monday.

The publication cites the Arabian Business news website, which claims that Gaddafi’s son died of burn wounds sustained during the attack.

“Now it is West which is bombarding Libya and they are doing it callously and they do not care who dies. They actually want Gaddafi himself to die,” President Mugabe said after meeting Chinese Vice-Premier Wang Qishan, who is in Zimbabwe to promote trade between Beijing and Harare.

President Mugabe said the West should not have been allowed to intervene because their interest was to control the resources of Libya.

He said although he did not agree with the system of government in Libya, he disagreed with the methods the Western powers were using in Libya.

On Sunday British Defence Secretary Liam Fox said targeting Gaddafi could “potentially be a possibility”.

But on Monday Britain’s Chief of Defence Staff, David Richards, said Gaddafi was “absolutely not” a target. “It’s not allowed under the UN resolution,” he added.

Coalition forces attacked Gaddafi’s compound on Sunday although the long-time ruler was not there prompting Libyan authorities to protest their leader was being targeted.

Allied forces carrying out air strikes in Libya say Gaddafi himself is not a target, despite an overnight attack against his compound.

The chief of the British armed forces said attacks on Libya’s leader were “not allowed” under a UN resolution calling for the protection of Libyan civilians.

And a French spokesman said that even if the Libyan leader’s exact location was known, he would not be fired on.

Gaddafi has been fighting a rebellion that broke out last month. The millitary action against Gaddafi began on Saturday with French air strikes in the east.

A barrage of cruise missiles, launched from US and British surface ships and submarines followed.

On Sunday US Navy Vice-Admiral William Gortney said the coalition had control of the air space between Tripoli and the main rebel stronghold of Benghazi in the east. “The no-fly zone is effectively in place,” he said.

He added that ground forces moving on rebel positions were also open to attack.

Meanwhile, Prime Morgan Tsvangirai on Monday briefed the visiting Chinese leader on progress made since the formation of the inclusive government two years ago following a disputed presidential run-off poll.

The meeting with Chinese Vice-Premier Wang Qishan comes as relations between President Mugabe and Tsvangitrai continue to deteriorate.

Tsvangirai last week went on a diplomatic offensive, meeting regional leaders to inform them of the problems besetting the GNU.

The Premier had earlier said the “marriage” was no longer working and there was need for “divorce”.

On Monday, Tsvangirai told told journalists at Munhumutapa Building: “I briefed him (Wang) on progress the inclusive government has made.”

He did not take any further questions. He said other issues centred on trade and investment.

Wang earlier urged Vice-President Joice Mujuru to safeguard Chinese investments in Zimbabwe.
targeted.
Allied forces carrying out air strikes in Libya say Gaddafi himself is not a target, despite an overnight attack against his compound.

The chief of UK armed forces said attacks on Libya’s leader were “not allowed” under a UN resolution calling for the protection of Libyan civilians.

And a French spokesman said that even if the Libyan leader’s exact location was known, he would not be fired on.

Gaddafi has been fighting a rebellion that broke out last month.

The action against Gaddafi began on Saturday with French air strikes in the east. A barrage of cruise missiles, launched from US and British surface ships and submarines followed.

On Sunday US Navy Vice Admiral William Gortney said the coalition had control of the air space between Tripoli and the main rebel stronghold, Benghazi in the east. “The no-fly zone is effectively in place,” he said.

He added that ground forces moving on rebel positions were also open to attack.

Meanwhile, Prime Morgan Tsvangirai yesterday briefed the visiting Chinese leader progress made since the formation of the inclusive government two years ago following a disputed presidential run –off poll.

The meeting with the Chinese Vice Premier Wang Qishan comes as relations between President Mugabe and Tsvangitrai continue to deteriorate.

Tsvangirai last week went on a diplomatic offensive meeting regional leaders to inform them of the problems besetting the GNU.

The premier had earlier said the marriage was no longer working and there was need for “divorce”.
Yesterday, Tsvangirai told told journalists at Munhumutapa Building: “I briefed him (Oishan) on progress the inclusive government has made.”

He did not take any further questions.

He said other issues centred on trade and investment.

Oishan earlier urged Vice President Joice Mujuru to safeguard their investments in Zimbabwe.