MDC MP's Son Attacked By Zanu (PF) Youths

Harare, – Zanu (PF) youths coming from an anti-sanctions rally organised by President Robert Mugabe beat up Munyaradzi Shoko, the son of Chitungwiza South Member of Parliament, Misheck Shoko, the Movement for Democratic Change said Thursday.\r\n

Mugabe launched the anti-sanctions petition at the Glamis arena which was attended by Zanu (PF) ministers and their supporters. The aim of the rally is to collect over two million signatures denouncing sanctions imposed by the European Union and the United States. Rowdy youths disturbed people in the central business district while some beat up people who were not planning to attend the Zanu (PF) rally. Shops were also closed after the attendants were forced to attend the Zanu (PF) rally.

"In Chitungwiza province, Munyaradzi Shoko, 27, the son to Chitungwiza South MP, Hon. Misheck Shoko was last night assaulted by six men some in army uniform in Unit G, Chitungwiza. A medical report, found Munyaradzi to be suffering from multiple head bruises, a “left eye haemorrhage, and swollen forehead”," the MDC said in a statement.

"The six who were driving a white pickup truck descended at Hon. Shoko’s house around midnight. They asked Munyaradzi who is a university student why he had not attended the Zanu (PF) restrictive measures event held in Harare on Wednesday. Munyaradzi received treatment at Chitungwiza General Hospital and made a report at Makoni Police Station. The police confirmed that there were soldiers based at the police station but it was irregular for them not to move in the suburb without a uniformed police officer."

Mugabe threatened Western owned companies with nationalisation if sanctions on the 87 leader and his close associates are not removed.

The EU has maintained that it will not remove sanctions until the country holds free and fair election and promotes free speech and open up the media environment among other things.

After the anti-sanctions event Zanu (PF) youths went rowdy marching in the city centre with some blocking traffic and roads as they went away.