Go get your locks on

Robin Chaibva Style Corner
\nTHERE is a group of individuals recognised by their choice of hairstyle. What makes this style special is that unlike other hairstyles, the individual is named after their hairdo.  While a person with a weave or bald head is not called “weavey” or “baldy”, a person wearing dreadlocks is called “dread” or “rasta”. Of course some get offended but others do not mind.

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But there is a common misconception about dreadlocks – that they originated from the Rastafarian religious group. Research has proved this to be untrue. While the global appeal of Rastafarian musical genres like reggae has increased the visibility of dreadlocks, the locking of hair has been around for centuries across different cultures.

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In Africa, the hairstyle dates back to ancient Egypt, Maasai in East Africa and Mouride Brotherhood in Senegal.
\nIn Southeast Asia dreadlocks are worn for religious reasons in different sects of Hinduism and Buddhism. There is no denying that this hairstyle is a global style, especially among kinky haired people.

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In Zimbabwe, locks are worn for various reasons which can include political statements, to show ethnic pride or religious convictions for African traditional religion and the Rastafarian way of life.

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For some, dreadlocks are simply a fashion statement.
\nPersonally, I drew some lessons from my one month attempt in becoming a “dread” as I came across mixed views and stereotypes.
\nDreadlocked people often get street credit and respect while getting discrimination from stores’ security and poor customer service. Labelled as rebels or revolutionaries, dreadlocked people are very noticeable.

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This, however, has not stopped Zimbabweans from choosing the hairstyle. From political figures, musicians, athletes to ordinary Zimbabweans, dreadlocks have become a fashion statement.

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More proof that dreadlocks are on demand is the recent South African story where a dreadlocked man had his locks shaved and stolen while he was asleep.

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So how can one get into the dreadlocks movement?
\nGetting dreadlocks takes time and patience. One can get dreadlocks through the crochet technique, a permanent way that does not require any chemical.

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Others prefer waxing, to bind the hair together using beeswax. This method requires more time when washing the hair.
\nMoulding gel can also be used, the hair will form dreadlocks with time.

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Another popular method, especially among females, is the sister locks. This is a special technique by professional hairdressers which creates small strand-like dreadlocks that will resemble hair and produce much smaller dreadlocks.

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But for those who do not have the patience, the faux locks are the new trend in town. This is when extensions are used to create dreadlocks, much like braiding hair.

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One last tip is to remember to always keep the dreadlocked hair clean.
\nJoin the global trend, everyone can be a rasta!

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Feedback: tatenda.chaibva@zimpapers.co.zw