Peter Moyo comes of age

Prince Mushawevato
\nTHE cracks and nooks of anything are better known by the original creator. This statement rings true for Peter “Young Igwe” Moyo, whose latest release “Mabasa aMwari” has ushered in a new era for the rising musician. The architects of the Utakataka Express beat, Gift “Shiga Shiga” Katulika and Spencer Kumbulani, have added the much needed zest on the new offering while the artistry and maturity of the Young Igwe himself is undeniable. lndeed the young lad is shoving in the right direction.

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Not only does “Mabasa aMwari” reveal that the Young Igwe is beginning to get the thrust of music, it also proves that the allure of the original members of the Utakataka Express is difficult to ignore.

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Thus the Young Igwe’s apparent enthusiasm coupled with the veterans’ experience resulted in the creation of a decent product that one will ignore at their own peril.

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Steadily, the Kwekwe-based singer’s second effort is gaining ground. Armed with six tracks, the new album coming after “Mushonga Mukuru”, is tightly knit and has long begun clouting for recognition.

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For Peter, the self-proclaimed sungura messiah, it might prove to be a case of history repeating itself. For those that follow music, the Shiga Shiga effect was there for all to see on the late Tongai “Dhewa” Moyo’s career.

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No doubt Dhewa or to some Igwe, registered his first major breakthrough in 2002 through the release of “Samanyemba” which carried the monster hit “Murozvi Mukuru”.

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But around 2003/4, Dhewa released “Chingwa” which had some rhumba lines. It however did not shake the market although it carried “Zvinoita Murudo”, which has grown to become one of the most requested Utakataka Express songs at live gigs.

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In 2005, Dhewa was to scale dizzy heights after the release of “Naye”, which was the first Utakataka Express project to feature Shiga Shiga. It was around that time that Dhewa started giving sungura king Alick Macheso sleepless nights.

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But just as Dhewa realised back in 2003 that the touch of the charismatic Shiga Shiga was the missing link, Peter also did the same in 2013 after releasing “Mushonga Mukuru”.The stubborn and arrogant budding artiste swallowed his pride and let Shiga Shiga, guitarists Spencer

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Khumbulani, Savious Karikodzi and Willard “Willo” Loti, and drummer Guyson Sixpense, return to their roots.
\nThe senior guys had abandoned ship when Utakataka Express founder Tongai Moyo died in 2011. However, together they toiled to create the new product.

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The talented men helped push the Young Igwe’s game. Of course, Peter had to work hard on his intonation so that he would not spoil the beautiful beats.However, high pitch notes are still a challenge to the young lad, he still needs to work on that single aspect to perfect his art. Nevertheless, the Young Igwe has worked hard and deserves due recognition for his effort.

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He rightfully pours his heart out in the opening track, “Samasimba”, which was done on a laid back but vintage Utakataka Express beat. The song is an emotional plea to the Almighty.

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In the track, the Kwekwe-based musician acknowledges that people go through difficulties in life but he reminds the listener that it is only God who can help us shrug them off for a better outcome.

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Without God, he sings, not even hard work will be rewarded. The song reaches its climax at the end when rhythm guitarist Evidence “Baba Gari” Tarabuka displays the wizardry in his fingers. “I’m not yet perfect but I think so far I have managed to do justice for my fans. I’m satisfied with the rate at which the album is penetrating the market,” said Peter.

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“Our engines are raving and we are not going to stop anytime soon. The thrust is to deliver the best for our fans. Moral is high within the group and that’s all we need to keep delivering.”Peter managed to compose thought-provoking songs. His composition skills were difficult to discern in the previous album since some of the songs like “Tutsotso”, “Konzi” and “Barika” were composed by his late father.This time around, the Young Igwe’s depth in social issues is visible throughout the six tracks. He effectively uses his age to bridge the gap between the older and younger generation.The chilled cadence in the album is maintained in the second track “Mavanga” while the party mood is evoked by Shiga Shiga’s now popular chant “bata pasi, bata pasi, chimupa moyo”.

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Immediately after the chant, Khumbulani enters with a powerful riff that proves why he is one of the most revered bassists in the country. And while one is still perplexed by the sound of the booming bass guitar, the gear changes, bringing in the pleasant sound of the melodic lead guitar tone.

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The free melodic sound of the lead guitar is one of Utakataka Express’s weapons.
\nAnd with Willo back on the instrument, one can expect nothing short of gross satisfaction of the soul. Even the late Tongai, who was also a fierce lead guitarist, had undying respect for Willo. He would frequently consult him on how best to enrich the outfit’s sound through the instrument they shared both on stage and in the studio.

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“Rudo Pasina” is defined by a laid back tempo that peaks half way through.This love song teaches people to be wary of individuals who make insincere love proposals.Borrowing from his father’s compositions, Peter came up with the song “Mhosva Dzemadzinza”. Tongai Moyo’s “Handidi Navo”, “Bvumavaranda” and “Mudzimu Weshiri” pleaded with the Almighty and the ancestors to look upon in his family.

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In “Handidi Navo”, Dhewa sang: “…musarange vana vangu nemhosava dzemanzinza, vana vangu handidi navo…”
\nOn the new track, the Young Igwe sings: “Vanochema Dhewa ava vakaringa kwamuri Ishe, vari kuchemera kundiso zve pamwe neyambutso…rugare huya undione, ini ndayaura, ini nemhuri yangu.”The other tracks that complete the album include “Domestic Violence” and “Pasina Mari” featuring Motswana singer Slizer.

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Though done on a sungura tip, the song blends both sungura and Slizer’s Afro-pop sound. Some argue that this is the best track on the album.lt is evident that the Young Igwe managed to flow with ease in the song, he was comfortable with the notes.“Domestic Violence” is a party track inclined to the jiti resonance that made groups like the Bhundu Boys popular within and across the borders back in the days. The fast paced beat keeps one on the dance floor.Admittedly there is still some distance to cover for Utakataka Express but at this rate, only the sky is the limit for the flamboyant ensemble.