Time to interrogate the real issues

I am not a big fan of British media. But the BBC’s HardTalk is an exception. It should be a required viewing for all journalism students.

The other day, I was watching the HardTalk interview featuring Zimbabwe’s other deputy prime minister, Arthur Mutambara.

A thrill a minute!

I never thought watching a television interview could be so fascinating and addictive.

The interviewer poked holes in Mutambara’s illusions and left him naked.

It was fun watching a politician making a fool of himself.

Why can’t our journalists be so potent and clinical in pursuing the truth?

Bring back the excitement into the news. PM Live, AM Live, 702 — they are all tame. Print media too. Politicians are allowed to get away with murder. They are treated with kid gloves. No in-depth analysis is offered.

Even the so-called experts and analysts bring no joy. All you hear are sound bites with no substance. Lazy analysis tends to distort the reality.

Take the current debate of the alleged African National Congress (ANC) takeover by the l eft. For the life of me, I can never locate this mysterious “left”. Who are they? How do you define the left? Don’t tell me, it’s those who can quote Karl Marx, smoke Cuban cigars and hero-worship Fidel Castro.

The leadership of the Congress of South African Trade Unions and the South African Communist Party cannot be defined as “left”. Merely shouting revolutionary sounding slogans does not make you Che Guevara. Talk of workers’ rights and threats of nationalisation are not enough.

Blade Nzimande and Zwelinzima Vavi are more capitalist than Patrice Motsepe. Can you call this comrade a communist who earns a salary of more than half a million a year, drives a German sedan, dines in Melrose Arch, lives in an affluent suburb of Jo’burg, flies first class, and sends his children to model C schools? If this is a hallmark of the “left” then I am an Afrikaner.

Honestly, who represents the “left” agenda in the ANC? I stand to be corrected, but is not the ANC by its nature a pro-poor organisation? The presence of few millionaires within its ranks does not change its character.

The question remains, what is eating the comrades? What are they squabbling over?

The real battle is about money and controlling state resources. It is not an ideological tussle between the communists and capitalists, it is pure personal greed by the elites.

Let us not sugar-coat or dignify personal greed as “left” ideology.

There is nothing leftist in comrades fighting for the control of the keys to the vault.

Let us not be fooled by slogans and rhetoric.

It is all a smokescreen.

It is time to interrogate the real issues and expose the lies.

Dr Lucas Ntyintyane

Cresta