Diasporans Key to Economic Growth – Mupfumira

Prisca Mupfumira

Birmingham — Government takes the Diaspora community as a critical sector that cannot be left out in the country’s economic turnaround strategy and achievement of Vision 2030.

Addressing Zimbabweans living in Birmingham, England recently, Environment, Tourism and Hospitality Industry Minister Prisca Mupfumira said the country’s re-engagement, reconstruction, Transitional Stabilisation Programme (TSP) and Vision 2030 will be difficult to attain without the participation of Diasporans.

“As Government, we will do everything in our powers to ensure that our Diaspora community participates in the Second Republic’s reconstruction and we are aware of the fact that it will be difficult to achieve all projects without our Diaspora community,” she said.

“To you, our Diaspora community, we say don’t be left out. Come home and visit.

“Come home and invest. You are our brand ambassadors. Raise the country’s flag high.”

Minister Mupfumira said the TSP, a short-term economic blueprint, and Vision 2030, were meant for all Zimbabweans and that everyone should be free to come on board and contribute.

“Zimbabwe is open for business,” she said.

“We now have a listening President. We want you to come home. We have opened all sectors to investment, take advantage of all and as Government, we will facilitate the processes as much as we can, from visa regimes to everything. Nothing is impossible.”

Minister Mupfumira is on a tour of the United Kingdom that has seen her meet Zimbabweans in Liverpool, Manchester, Birmingham and London, among others, explaining existing tourism industry development and investment opportunities.

“You might be aware that when the land reform came, some people were left behind thinking it was a Zanu-PF project,” she said.

“Now they want the land, but the land is no longer there.

“Today I am saying ‘come and take up investment space’. Don’t be left out.

“If you are left out, foreigners will take up investment space and in future you will cry for another industrial revolution, just like some who are now crying for another land reform.”

State power utility, ZESA paid some US$396,000 to companies that