bob marleyGodwin Muzari and Wellington Kudiwa
Bob Marley’s song about the liberation of Zimbabwe echoed in many venues in the capital over the weekend as various artistes at different night spots presented honourary celebrations for the late reggae icon.Today marks the 34th anniversary of Marley’s death and last weekend’s events were aimed at celebrating the musician’s great works that include his contribution to the celebration of Zimbabwe’s Independence.

Marley was the main act at Rufaro Stadium during the country’s Independence celebrations in 1980. His song “Zimbabwe”, which he performed at the historic event, remains an important reminder of how the country celebrated the end of colonial rule with the international musician putting his weight behind the important transition.

The musician died a year later but his music still echoes across the world and the connection to Zimbabwe is still strong, especially through the song “Zimbabwe”.

In the song, Marley, who many regarded as prophetic in his lyrics, warned against being used to sell out the revolution of empowering the majority.

“So soon we’ll find out who is the real revolutionary/ And I don’t want my people to be tricked by mercenaries,” go the lyrics in part.

Marley emphasises the need to continue fighting for the protection of our rights and his message has indeed been prophetic since some individuals, parties and organisations are being used to derail the country’s gains through promises of monetary rewards – the mercenaries that the musician warned against.

The musician seemed to have foreseen the possibility of internal struggle. He saw the danger of power struggles and proclaimed that he did support people that are contrary to the revolution.

“No more internal power struggle/ We come together to overcome the little trouble.

“Soon we’ll find out who is the real revolutionary/ ‘Cause I don’t want my people to be contrary.”

So, when the song “Zimbabwe” echoed at venues like The Basement, Book Café and Junction 24 where the Bob Marley commemoration gigs took place over the weekend, the lyrics reminded music lovers about the importance of our sovereignty and the musician’s legendary prowess that made him an international icon.

Transit Crew staged a good show at Book Café and did cover versions of the musician’s songs much to the delight of the audience.

At The Basement, first on stage was Ras Jabu who sang a number of Bob Marley’s songs much to the amusement of the crowd as the old hand instrumentalist proved his mettle as he once performed alongside Bob Marley.

Some of the songs included classics “One Love”,” Redemption Song” and “We Jamming” which got the crowd tapping their feet and singing along to the familiar melodies.

The other outstanding performances came from Potatoe Ponkie Dat and I-Watta who both turned the night into a Zimdancehall revelry as the two musicians made an instantaneous impact which saw the dozy crowd suddenly getting lively.

In an interview with The Herald Entertainment, forgotten dancehall artist, Malvin S, revealed how the event helps upcoming artistes to get recognition.

‘’As you know the Bob Marley Commemoration show is something that is celebrated internationally it gives upcoming reggae musicians a platform to learn from their elder compatriots .

‘’Upcoming musicians can also carve up ideas with each other and formulate arrangements for future collaborations’’ he said.

Event organiser Trevor Hall said the event was quite successful as everything went according to plan despite the actuality that the crowd was much smaller than expected.

He also had some kind words for both the artistes and the small crowd.

‘’We really appreciate the time you dedicated to participate in this show and you should all remember that as artistes music is about one love and unity.

‘’People should not divide artistes by saying someone is better than someone because music is not a competition but is a mission’’ he added.

Yesterday, Junction 24 presented a family outing in remembrance of the musician and a number of young and established artistes were on the line-up.

The shows were part of the commemorations that are held annually in the country in honour of Marley.

 The song ‘Zimbabwe’ by Bob Marley

No more internal power struggle;

We come together to overcome the little trouble.

Soon we’ll find out who is the real revolutionary,

‘Cause I don’t want my people to be contrary.

 

And, brother, you’re right, you’re right,

You’re right, you’re right, you’re so right!

We’ll ‘ave to fight (we gon’ fight), we gonna fight (we gon’ fight)

We’ll ‘ave to fight (we gon’ fight), fighting for our rights!

 

Mash it up in-a (Zimbabwe);

Natty trash it in-a (Zimbabwe);

Africans a-liberate Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

I’n’I a-liberate Zimbabwe.

 

(Brother, you’re right,) you’re right,

You’re right, you’re right, you’re so right!

We gon’ fight (we gon’ fight), we’ll ‘ave to fight (we gon’ fight),

We gonna fight (we gon’ fight), fighting for our rights!

 

To divide and rule could only tear us apart;

In every man chest, mm – there beats a heart.

So soon we’ll find out who is the real revolutionaries;

And I don’t want my people to be tricked by mercenaries.

 

Brother, you’re right, you’re right,

You’re right, you’re right, you’re so right!

We’ll ‘ave to fight (we gon’ fight), we gonna fight (we gon’ fight),

We’ll ‘ave to fight (we gon’ fight), fighting for our rights!

 

Natty trash it in-a Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Mash it up in-a Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Set it up in-a Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Africans a-liberate Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Africans a-liberate Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Natty dub it in-a Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe).

 

Set it up in-a Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Africans a-liberate Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe);

Every man got a right to decide his own destiny.