Oliver Mtukudzi falls sick

HARARE – Oliver Mtukudzi who was meant to perform tonight in Bulawayo together with South African celebrated musician, Ringo Madlingozi, has apologised and issued a statement that he is not going to make it due to unpleasant health that is is currently enduring.

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The show which was organised by Groove Entertainment is currently in progress though the 62-year-old Black Spirits frontman has failed to make it to Bulawayo, leaving hundreds of fans unhappy. In his apology, Tuku told his fans that he has fallen sick and has been advised by his doctor to rest.

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“We regret to inform our fans that Oliver Mtukudzi will not be able to perform in Bulawayo tonight as earlier advertised. This is because he has been taken ill with flu and his diabetic condition is currently volatile. We regret any inconveniences caused and we would like to promise our fans that we will hold another show in Bulawayo as soon as our dates permit,” reads part of the official press statement issued by Tuku Music.

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Tuku’s health has been the subject of speculation in recent years although the “Bvuma wachembera” hitmaker is known to be diabetic and has openly spoken about it. According to Daisy, Tuku loves to eat traditional food such sadza rezviyo due to his diabetic condition.

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In 2013, Tuku took his health issue to the media and disclosed his HIV status. The Zimbabwean music superstar in January 2013, moved to quash rumours that he is HIV-positive following several false stories that he had died which rocked social network platforms in 2012.

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The then 60-year-old music maestro told CNN’s African Voices programme at the weekend that although he had many relatives who had succumbed to Aids, he was not HIV-positive himself.

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“I am not HIV-positive myself but I have dealt with HIV and Aids programmes, a lot of them,” he said.

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He disclosed that his brother Robert and four of his band members had died of Aids in quick succession in the 1980s.

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“My brother Robert died of Aids so I had all the reason to try and help and give awareness to the people and fight the stigma,” Mtukudzi said.

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“I am glad the stigma in Zimbabwe has fallen away, not completely though. People now talk about it, they don’t hide it. I am one of the very first artists in Zimbabwe to be approached about HIV by the World Health Organisation, that was 1987,” he told CNN.