MTHWAKAZI Republic Party (MRP) leader Mqondisi Moyo has reiterated his party’s position not to contest the presidential poll, saying he will stand as a Matobo North constituency parliamentary candidate.

BY NQOBANI NDLOVU

MRP is contesting the country’s elections for the first time since the secessionist opposition party was launched.

The party is, however, only fielding candidates in Bulawayo, Matabeleland North and South and parts of Midlands.

Moyo said MRP saw no value in contesting the presidential race, adding the party was only motivated to grab seats in southern Zimbabwe in line with the party’s regional thrust.

“We would like to announce our non-participation in the presidential vote. We are coming in the political terrain to prove to our people that what they need is not a president, but political power,” he told journalists at the Press club recently.

“Surely, the marginalisation of Mthwakazi people has not been by a president, but by a political organism that controls the levers of power. We need political power than a president. We will fight tirelessly for democratic pluralism as we march towards to total restoration of our nation.

“We urge our people to vote for MRP for the control of our local governance and representation Parliament.”

Moyo also said the party is not backing any presidential candidate in the upcoming harmonised elections.

“Why should we? We are for restoration of the Mthwakazi state and nothing else hence not backing any presidential candidate,” he said.

According to the Zimbabwe Electoral Commission, 133 political parties have registered to contest the July 30 elections.

MRP’s election campaign is anchored on the need for devolution of power and tailored towards pushing for the restoration of the state of Mthwakazi.

The MRP’s manifesto highlights a plethora of grievances against central government, emanating from what the party says is a deliberate discrimination of the Matabeleland region which can only be halted by implementing devolution of power.

The Constitution guarantees devolution of power, but little or nothing has been done since it was adopted to operationalise the decentralisation of government.