Vote-splitting benefits Zanu PF

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THAT the forced removal from office of former President Robert Mugabe and the death of Morgan Tsvangirai has resulted in the resurgence of both Zanu PF and MDC-T ahead of the forthcoming presidential elections later this year is not in doubt anymore.

Although there are many political parties mulling to fight in the crunch election, the real contest could be between Zanu PF leader President Emmerson Mnangagwa and MDC-T and MDC Alliance presidential aspirant Nelson Chamisa, if events on the ground are anything to go by.

It must be set out, however, that the MDC-T and MDC Alliance chances of winning the elections outrightly against Mnangagwa could be scuppered due to fired former deputy president Thokozani Khupe’s launch of her own MDC-T (Thokozani) party to spite her erstwhile friends.

It is clear as the sun will rise that going into the harmonised elections with a divided opposition will only give Zanu PF an easy victory, and hence the need for Chamisa and Khupe to go and resolve their differences amicably and come up with a united front.

No doubt Matabeleland regions have traditionally been MDC-T strongholds, but there is a possibility that some of the opposition supporters could sympathise with Khupe and throw in their lot with her. This clearly will divide the MDC-T vote.

Chamisa should know that there is power in numbers and going into such a crucial election divided in Matabeleland would likely be the opposition’s Achilles’ Heel.

It is indeed a good thing that both leaders appear to see reason. Zimbabweans believe what unites them is greater than what divides them.

Zimbabweans frustrated and tired of Zanu PF misrule are counting on the MDC-T to dislodge it from power through the ballot and they need all the support they can get.

The opposition leaders cannot afford to be divided in-house, for ancient wisdom says, a house divided by itself cannot stand.

There is need for a lot of soul searching within the MDC-T leadership given some of the nasty exchanges that have taken place — unnecessarily. The level of malice, vindictiveness and intolerance that has been demonstrated had probably poisoned relations and would have made a reunion impossible.

It is hoped that the parties involved will be able to deal with that and move forward for their own good and that of their supporters who are counting on them.